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[PHOTO]
Laure Prouvost “Signs”

Laure Prouvost “Signs”

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[PHOTO]
Mona Hatoum performing “Look No Body!” 1981

Mona Hatoum performing “Look No Body!” 1981

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[PHOTO]
Katerina Drzkova “Refugees” 2007
Documentary photographs of refugees digitally manipulated and colored. The refugees appear in new spaces constructed according to their wishes

Katerina Drzkova “Refugees” 2007

Documentary photographs of refugees digitally manipulated and colored. The refugees appear in new spaces constructed according to their wishes

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[PHOTO]
Eberhard Havekost “Markus 2, DD02” 2002

Eberhard Havekost “Markus 2, DD02” 2002

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[PHOTO]
Eberhard Havekost “Monitor Mono, D988” 1998

Eberhard Havekost “Monitor Mono, D988” 1998

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[PHOTO]
Christian Andersson “9 Was 6 If”
The two chairs change in colour every 4th minute. What looks like two ordinary chairs on display, is in fact two totally modified replicas holding an internal water system. This allows the chairs to change in temperature, as cold or hot water is pumped through their system. The changing temperature affects the surface of the chairs, coated with thermochrome (heat-reacting) paint. When the chair is cold, it is black, but when heated up it turns white
 

Christian Andersson “9 Was 6 If”

The two chairs change in colour every 4th minute. What looks like two ordinary chairs on display, is in fact two totally modified replicas holding an internal water system. This allows the chairs to change in temperature, as cold or hot water is pumped through their system. The changing temperature affects the surface of the chairs, coated with thermochrome (heat-reacting) paint. When the chair is cold, it is black, but when heated up it turns white

 

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[PHOTO]
Wade Guyton “untitled action sculpture (Breuer)” 2004

Wade Guyton “untitled action sculpture (Breuer)” 2004

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[PHOTO]
Gerhard Richter “Shadow Picture” 1968

Gerhard Richter “Shadow Picture” 1968

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[PHOTO]
Thomas Eggerer

Thomas Eggerer

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[PHOTO]
Stan Douglas “Hors-Champ” 1992
" Hors-champs (meaning “off-screen”) is a video installation that addresses the political context of free jazz in the 1960s, as an extension of black consciousness and is one of his few works to directly address race.[18]
Four American musicians, George Lewis (trombone), Douglas Ewart (saxophone), Kent Carter (bass) and Oliver Johnson (drums) who lived in France during the free jazz period in the 1960s, improvise Albert Ayler’s 1965 composition “Spirits Rejoice.”.Free jazz often found a larger audience in Europe and was associated with politics and in particular in France where it was utilized by the French Communist Party during May 1968.
The music is in four parts, a gospel melody, an attenuated call and response, a heraldic fanfare and “La Marseillaise.” Shot in the style of 1960s French television program and using period technology,[16] the work is projected onto a screen, verso and recto. On one side is the “broadcast” version, a montage taken from two cameras, what would be chosen to be transmitted to the home audience. The other side shows the raw footage, the images not meant for public viewing, what was edited out. The two sides of the screen present a complete document of the performance, one in which the viewer must negotiate,depicting the “authorized” version but also the conditions of its production. What is being emphasized is a contrast between the banality of television and the radical programming that was featured at the time.”

Stan Douglas “Hors-Champ” 1992

" Hors-champs (meaning “off-screen”) is a video installation that addresses the political context of free jazz in the 1960s, as an extension of black consciousness and is one of his few works to directly address race.[18]

Four American musicians, George Lewis (trombone), Douglas Ewart (saxophone), Kent Carter (bass) and Oliver Johnson (drums) who lived in France during the free jazz period in the 1960s, improvise Albert Ayler’s 1965 composition “Spirits Rejoice.”.Free jazz often found a larger audience in Europe and was associated with politics and in particular in France where it was utilized by the French Communist Party during May 1968.

The music is in four parts, a gospel melody, an attenuated call and response, a heraldic fanfare and “La Marseillaise.” Shot in the style of 1960s French television program and using period technology,[16] the work is projected onto a screen, verso and recto. On one side is the “broadcast” version, a montage taken from two cameras, what would be chosen to be transmitted to the home audience. The other side shows the raw footage, the images not meant for public viewing, what was edited out. The two sides of the screen present a complete document of the performance, one in which the viewer must negotiate,depicting the “authorized” version but also the conditions of its production. What is being emphasized is a contrast between the banality of television and the radical programming that was featured at the time.